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The UK-US ant child porn taskforce should look more closely at the deep weeb

The UK is taking the lead in the battle against child porn over the internets.

On Monday 18th October, British PM David Cameron gathered with Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt, Microsoft Chief Executive Steve Ballmer, internet service providers, Joanna Shields, the National Crime Agency, the Internet Watch Foundation and the NSPCC to talk about 'how to rid the internet of child abuse', says the communique.

In my opinion, the most significant measure from this meeting is the partnership between UK and US forces to target the now hidden offenders. The mission of such a taskforce will have for mission to search the 'hidden internet', or 'dark web', for child sexual abuse material.
Well, finally a smart move.

Not to be misunderstood: removing paedophiles and child porn material from Google and Bing search engines is more than necessary. It is, in fact, even quite remarkable that nobody did that long ago.
However, it is by no means big news that most of today's consumers of such material are no longer searching publicly on Google whatever disgusting thing they're looking for. The 'dark web' and the wonderful capabilities of the Tor network offer a whole new land to explore and unprecedented privacy for outlaws.

Silk Road, the now famous drugs marketplace, closed by the US at the beginning of October, was only available through a Tor connection, for example. Comparable websites dedicated to child porn are widely available on the Tor network, and I am quite surprised by the content you can find rather easily once plugged in. Publicly available anonimity has its virtues and its vices; and one of the latter is that even the most wicked criminals also enjoy this security.

Wired studied the closure of Silk Road and proved yesterday that the US forces are able to track down criminals living in between the Tor onions. So here we are: the police forces of the world should partner up with Interpol in order to fight child pornography more efficiently.
Fighting the crime on the dark web was just proven difficult, because navigating in this labyrinth of non-indexed pages and anonymous users offers no grip nor trails to the investigators. Although, 'difficult' does not means 'impossible.'

Problem is: the taskforce will not be operational before next year. At least a whole year for paedophiles to enjoy themselves rather freely. And we're not even talking about the private networks.